Category Archives: sugar-free

Deliciously simple vegetable soup recipe/ Simple y deliciosa sopa de vegetales

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Instructions in Spanish below

Simple veggie soup

This simple recipe is based on seasonal plant-based ingredients. The soup is delicious and it satisfies us during the Fall days. As it is made with simple ingredients that do not include fats or processed foods, it is very easy to digest, and perfect for a light supper on a cold day.

-DSC_1018sm1 big white or yellow onion
1 garlic clove
5 fine slices of ginger
1 diced jalapeño
2 carrots
2 diced yams
half a squash
a bunch of parsely
a bunch of spinach
3 celery sticks
1 sliced red bell pepper
a handful of dulse or nori flakes
a big spoonful of miso paste
a teaspoon of cumin
cayenne pepper
turmeric
filtered water

 

Instructions

Fill up a big pot with filtered water and bring it to a boil, as you add the hard root vegetables, that take longer to cook: yams, squash, ginger, carrots. Continue to add the rest of the veggies and the seaweed for seasoning, that give a delicious salty flavor to soups with the added benefit of the sea minerals. Cover until it boils. Add now the miso paste and the spices. Cook for 5 minutes and keep covered. Enjoy!

 

Sopa de vegetales

Esta simple receta está basada en ingredientes de la temporada, privilegiando el origen vegetal. La sopa es deliciosa, y nos satisface durante los primeros fríos del otoño. Ayudan a la digestión, porque los ingredients son simples y no incluye grasas o productos procesados. Nos da energía y felicidad.

Ingredientes

-DSC_1033sm1 cebolla blanca o amarilla grande
1 diente de ajo
5 rodajas finas de jengibre
1 jalapeño picado
2 zanahorias cortadas en rodajas
2 camotes cortados en cuadraditos
Media calabaza cortada en cuadritos
1 atado de perejil
1 atado de espinaca
3 apios
1 chile dulce rojo cortado en rodajas1 puñado de copos de dulse or nori (o sal de mar a gusto)
1 cucharada de miso
1 cucharadita de comino
Pimienta de cayena a gusto
Agua filtrada

 

Preparación:
Llenar una olla grande con agua filtrada y poner a hervir en la estufa. Agregar los vegetales duros, que llevan más tiempo de cocción: los camotes, la calabaza, el jengibre, las zanahorias. Continuar agregando el resto de los vegetales. Agregar el dulce o el nori (o la sal de mar) y cubrir con una tapa hasta que hierva. Cuando hierve, agregar el miso y las especies. Dejar cocinar por unos 5 minutos más y dejar tapado.

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Are you “inflamed”?

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Clean-CoveI know that this question might elicit different responses at this moment. Today we could feel “inflamed” due to another example of how the justice system in this country has shown one more time that we are really not all equal under the law. And I would say that is a very justified way of feeling, and at some point, I promise I’ll write a post about this.

But what I really mean when I ask this question is if you have stopped to think whether your body has created an inflamed environment that is prone to disease, which eventually could become chronic. Some of my clients complain about digestive issues, for example, and this condition is a result of inflammation.

I am reading an excellent book that explains the relation of inflammation and the need for detoxification, Clean: The Revolutionary Program to Restore the Body’s Natural Ability to Heal Itself. Author and fellow rioplatense Alejandro Junger, M.D. explains this condition

…inflammation is a survival mechanism of great complexity. [It] occurs when a set of chemicals in the blood are activated by something foreign or broken. These chemicals attract defense cells that protect tissues against whatever is injuring them, from a thorn to a disease-causing microbe. The repair system is also activated by calling in different cells to fix the damage. Normally, inflammation is self-regulated, which means that as soon as it is triggered, it will start reactions that will stop further inflammation. However, if the body is constantly exposed to irritants, the inflammation response is switched on all the time—not just at small specific sites, but systemically all over the body and throughout the blood. This is what happens when exposure to toxins is high: modern humans are chronically inflamed. Inflammation (from the Latin word inflatio, “to set on fire”) becomes to the body’s environment what wildfires are to the planet’s” (92).

Only now modern medicine has recognized that inflammation is the common condition underlying chronic ailments like cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and autoimmune disorders. So, how can we prevent inflammation? We need to consider that, in addition to environmental toxins and stress, the ingestion of certain foods promote inflammation. For example:

  • Packaged and processed foods and drinks that contain additives, preservatives and other chemicals
  • Acid producing foods: red meat, refined grains (mostly gluten)
  • Dairy
  • Sugars
  • Alcohol
  • Coffee
  • Trans-fats: hydrogenated oils
  • Foods that can cause irritation and allergies:
  • nightshade family: tomatoes, sweet peppers, eggplant, potatoes
  • Strawberries, chocolate, shellfish
  • Peanuts

If we reduce the intake of these foods, and add anti-inflammatory nutrients to our diet, like Omega 3 fatty acids (hemp, flax and chia seeds, walnuts, algae, fish and krill oil), curcumin (turmeric), plants that contain polyphenols, like all types of berries, raw plants that cool down our system and dark leafy greens that support liver detoxification (my favorite are dandelions), we limit our stressors and we cleanse our system regularly, we will keep inflammation in check. Dr Junger asserts that the root of inflammation is the “the toxicity of modern life, and our bodies’ weakness in dealing with it. Only when we start a treatment there, targeting the seed of the problem, can we truly begin to ward off disease” (11).

This is why I am so insistent on periodic detoxifications of our bodies. It’s not that I’m a broken record, it’s that periodic cleanses are the most effective and empowering practices to keep our bodies clean and healthy.

If reading this post has convinced you that it’s time for a tune-up, please check my upcoming DIY Mid-Summer Community Cleanse and Raw Food Preparation Class starting July 27. Your body and the planet will thank you for it.

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Dandelions: let food be your medicine

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photoLlegó la primavera y el amor!

I love spring time! I love the weather and to be able to witness nature yawning back to life. How beautiful!

When I walk in the mornings or when I go out and feed the pack of (former) stray cats in my backyard, I am welcomed by a flourish of colorful and aromatic aliveness. Bouganvillia and morning glory blooming, jasmines of all types sharing their equisite aroma… And my favorite: yes, the loyal dandelions. Most people want to kill them, because they feel they are “weeds,” but I love to forage them because they are locally and seasonally grown and they are FREE!!!! And, of course, they have amazing medicinal properties.

According to a post by David Metz, Certified Clinical Herbalist, “Dandelions: from weed to medicine,” these herbs have “been known for perhaps thousands of years as a springtime cleanser and rejuvenator. The young leaves are perfect in the spring to cleanse your liver, kick-start your kidneys and release the winter stagnancy out of your muscles and bones.”  He adds that they are also “a premier digestive aid,” easing ” indigestion, gas and bloating.” Moreover, the bitterness of the herb helps the liver to release built-up bile,  “making dandelion good for gallstones, gout, jaundice, constipation, acne and eczema.”

Dandelions are also used as diuretics and a “potent anti-inflammatory, a cholesterol reducer, a type 2 diabetes balancer, and a reducer of muscular pain and swelling.  These qualities are due to its cooling nature. “

So, I invite you to try these amazing plants. How can we eat them? Well, I make the most delicious salad; simple, tasty and stimulating. Enjoy!SAM_0345

Dandelion Greens Salad

1 bunch of thinly sliced dandelion greens

½ cup chopped mushrooms

3 chopped garlic cloves.

a handfull of cranberries

Dressing: olive oil, raw apple cider vinegar and 1 tbsp. amino acids (Braggs) made with fermented soy beans.

Equipment: bowl, knife, chopping board

Gluten* and sugar- free fruit and nut cookies-Galletas de frutas secas y nueces sin gluten* ni azúcar

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-DSC_1113smThis is a deliciously  healthy snack that can be dehydrated or baked

Ingredients

2 cups of assorted dry fruits (soaked 4-6 hours)
1 cup of pitted dates (soaked 4-6 hours)
1 cup of pecan nuts
1 cup of shredded/grated coconut
1 cup of flax seeds
1 cup of oat groats
2 tablespoons of raw agave nectar
Coconut oil to cover the cookie sheet

Preparation
Filter the water used to soak the dry fruits and dates and keep it.  Process the fruit and dates in the Cuisinart and place in a bowl. Frind the flax seeds and the oat groats and add to the bowl. Mix well, using the water used for soaking the fruits. Add chopped nuts, shredded coconut and the agave. Continue to blend and add the water as needed. The consistency should be firm, in order to shape the cookies. You can bake them in the oven at 400 degrees for 45 minutes or dehydrate for 24 hours. Enjoy!

* thank you, Lorena, for your comment. Oats don’t have gluten naturally, but many times they are packed in facilities that handle other grains with gluten. Make sure to use uncontaminated oats to prepare this recipe.

 
Estas galletas son muy saludables, y se pueden hornear o deshidratar

Ingredientes
2 tazas de frutas secas variadas remojadas en agua filtrada por 4-6 horas.
1 taza de dátiles sin carozo remojadas en agua filtrada por 4-6 horas.
1 taza de nueces pecan (se pueden remojar también)
1 taza de coco rallado
1 taza de semillas de linaza
1 taza de granos de avena
2 cucharadas de nectar de agave
Aceite de coco para aceitar la asadera

Preparación
Filtre el agua que se usó para remojar las frutas secas y los dátiles y guárdela. Ponga las frutas y los dátiles en una procesadora y procese bien y pase a un bol. Muela las semillas de linaza y los granos de avena y agregue al bol. Mezcle bien usando el agua del remojo. Agregue las nueces picadas, el coco rallado y el agave. Siga mezclando y agregue agua cuando la necesite. La consistencia debe ser firme, para formar copos en la asadera. Aceite la asadera y ponga la masa en copos para hacer las galletas. Cocine en horno de 400 grados por 45 minutos.

* Gracias, Lorena, por tu comentario. Si bien la avena no tiene gluten naturalmente, muchas veces se empaqueta en establecimientos con otros granos que sí lo tienen. Para asegurarse de que la receta no tiene gluten, por favor, asegúrense de que la avena no ha sido contaminada.