Category Archives: sprouting

My interview for the San Diego Veg Festival

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At wonderful veg cafe Casa de Luz, with organizers extraordinaires Linda Le and Elza Angulo

At wonderful veg cafe Casa de Luz, with organizers extraordinaires Linda Le and Elza Angulo

Last weekend I was invited to be a guest demo speaker for the second annual San Diego Veg Festival. I was asked to share my experience as a raw food educator and holistic healer, and it was a great opportunity to meet people ready to recover their health by choosing healthier food options. Here’s the interview:

  1. 1.      What do you enjoy most about your career in the veg community?

I enjoy the fact that it’s growing so fast. More and more people are getting into a plant-based diet and becoming much more aware of the issues related to the eating of animal products. In my own area of raw food, I see people experimenting with green juices and smoothies daily, and seeing the incredibly positive effects that these have in their health. I feel there is a change in consciousness in many areas, and food is one of them. People realize that to change the world, we need to change individually—as members of a larger community—and one of the ways is by paying attention to how we fuel our bodies, that is in accordance with a sustainable way of preserving our planet. Moreover, as a food justice activist, I believe in autonomous and vibrantly healthy individuals and communities, and that our bodies are the ultimate site of self-determination. So, in order to become really autonomous, the first thing we need to do is decolonize our bodies from commercial, processed food and other substances that keep us lethargic and lacking in energy.

  1. 2.      What is one thing you wish someone had told you before becoming a vegan/vegetarian?

Fortunately, I started exploring a raw food diet and cleansing in January 2002, when I participated in a program called The 21 Day Detox, led in Los Angeles by two amazing individuals, both naturopaths, Richard D’Andrea, M.D., and John Woods. I learnt so much from them, that I think they prepared me very well to go on my own journey safely. That’s why I have taken it to heart to teach other people how to develop personalized cleanses that are effective and safe. I felt the duty to share my experience with the Chicano/a Latino/a communities with whom I interact daily, as there is a lot of chronic disease and obesity in these communities due to a less than optimal diet resulting from the lack of good fresh produce in the “food deserts” where many of these people reside.

  1. 3.      What caused you to want to become veg friendly?

I was raised in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where the ingestion of meat is overwhelming. When I arrived in this country in 1988 to pursue a doctoral program, luckily, I started eating much less meat because I felt it didn’t taste as good as back home. I also come from a history of emotional eating, so the idea of exploring a raw food diet and periodic detoxing was very appealing to me. It happened right at a time in my life when my spiritual practices were becoming much deeper, and it was natural for me to change my diet to support that process.

  1. 4.      Tell us more about your business? How can we get connected?

After years of hosting seasonal community cleanses and raw food preparation classes, I decided to retire from my position as a college professor and work full-time in the area of health. I became certified as a holistic health coach and have been growing my practice since late 2011. I am using everything I learnt in my own journey to support post-menopausal women to recover their power over their bodies, and debunk disempowering beliefs about aging. As a holistic healer, I model for my clients how to courageously step center-stage in their lives by unleashing their unique personal power, creative self-expression and overall wellbeing. I offer bilingual programs that inspire individuals to reconnect with their bodies, minds and spirits by going back to the basics of a healthy lifestyle: a personalized nutrient-rich diet, energizing physical movement and a meaningful spiritual practice. I specialize in weight management for women in their prime through life-changing programs that include DIY detoxifications, live foods and powerful transformational techniques. I also offer wellness seminars in English and Spanish.

I have a blog that focuses on live foods and detoxifications, http://livefoods4life.com/, and my holistic healing website is www.vivamivida.com.

  1. 5.      What other activities are you involved with in San Diego?

Every six months I spend a week doing a deep detox at the Optimum Health Institute in Lemon Grove, an amazing institution that firmly believes in the power of food as medicine. They follow Anne Wigmore’s principles of using the healing power of live food (sprouting, fermenting, juicing, lots of wheatgrass) to restore health. Every Friday morning, guests have the opportunity to share to the community their testimonials about healing with the power of plants. I have seen time and again hundreds of cases of individuals with “incurable diseases”–as defined by the traditional medical industrial complex–, make a 100% recovery and regain their health and vitality by sticking to this type of diet. Everything that I’ve learnt at OHI I share with the participants of my workshops and cleanses. I am looking forward to continue to collaborate with the San Diego Veg community in spreading this information to the public.

  1. 6.      What tips do you have for those wanting to stay on a veg-friendly path?

I would invite individuals to consider practicing a plant-based diet. I have seen many vegetarians and vegans who eat a lot of processed food, fake meats, etc. I think that the power of being on a veg-friendly path is to get acquainted with the amazing power of plants. That’s the natural fuel that our bodies need. And, if some “slips” happen, to just recommit and continue on the path. There are so many different varieties, flavors, textures, ways of preparing plants, that there is no way that we would feel deprived (not even in the intake of protein!). Also, I would suggest that individuals explore and pay close attention to their ancestral diet. According to the principle of “bio-individuality,” the great diversity of body types demand different types of diets.  Usually, whatever our ancestors ate, our bodies do well with. We can always modify those traditional dishes with choices that are more congruent with the diet that we choose now.

  1. 7.      What are your favorite veg dishes?

I like very simple flavors, and I eat mostly what I prepare at home. I love greens, and I prepare them in juices and smoothies, salads and wraps. I always tell the participants of my food preparation workshops that I am not that interested in gourmet raw food, that my diet mostly responds to the requirements of a “colon boot camp.” I’m interested mainly in food that makes me feel vibrant and healthy and that keeps my body clean. That’s why I am very much into fermentation and sprouting. I always sprout my beans, grains and nuts, and if I happen to prepare a cooked quinoa dish (my favorite grain/seed), I will sprout it for a couple of days first, so that the life force and enzymatic power gets unleashed and becomes more digestible and nutritious.

8. What advice do you have for those that are interested or curious about being a vegetarian/vegan?

I usually suggest to my clients to start slowly, adding veggies and fruits into their diet. The best way to do that is with green juices and smoothies. I have seen time and again that as people start to add these delicious and nutrient rich drinks into their diet, their taste buds get used to the natural flavors, they start to crave veggies and fruits due to the fact that they feel much better eating clean, and slowly, their diet starts transforming completely. This is a wonderful way to jump start a journey towards a plant-based diet. Enjoy the process, and don’t become too dogmatic, just find pleasure in your new choices!

To receive information on my upcoming programs, please sign here.

Sprouting grains, seeds and beans/ Cómo germinar granos, semillas y frijoles

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mesa tendida 2 - CopySprouting grains (rye, red hard winter wheat, quinoa) and beans (red lentils)

Rinse one cup of the grains or beans three times with filtered water to remove impurities. Place in jar and add enough filtered water so that it doubles the size of the beans. Soak for 8 hours (or overnight). After soaking, rinse again with filtered wáter and allow to sit inside a sprouting bag or jar so that the wáter drains. This will start the sprouting process. Rinse twice a day until a little tail starts to grow. The materials you will need are: sprouting jars, sprouting bags, bowls, filtered water.

Sprouted quinoa could be used in salads and to substitute rice in veggie wraps/ sushi.  In order to grow wheatgrass, you will need to sprout red hard winter wheat. You can also make a delicious salad with sprouted red lentils. Instructions to follow:

Red lentil salad

one cup of 3 day sprouted lentils

Lemon

Garlic

red onion

cilantro

apple cider vinegar

olive oil

salt

Chop all these ingredients and mix with the lentils

Wheatgrass

Serves as an awesome detoxifier, antioxidant, and to alcalize our blood, to suppress hunger, as a powerful healing agent, even of chronic disease as cancer, diabetes, etc.

Rinse one or two cups of the red hard winter wheat berries three times with filtered water to remove impurities. Place in a big jar and add enough filtered water so that it doubles the size of the grains. Soak for 8 hours (or overnight). After soaking, rinse again with filtered water and allow to sit inside a sprouting bag or jar so that the water drains. This will start the sprouting process. Rinse twice a day until a little tail starts to grow. After 2 or 3 days the grains are ready to be placed in organic compost inside a flat. Cover the sprouted wheat berries with a paper towel and water. Cover it and keep it in the dark. Water every day. The third day, lift the cover and allow grains to grow in the light (away from direct sunlight).  If it’s too humid, don’t water. This is a winter grain, it doesn’t like the heat or humidity. When it grows 7 cm, harvest and juice. It’s the optimal time of the plant.

How to make compost

Place all the vegetable and fruit left-overs in a dark bin and mix with dry leaves. Turn around several times a week and keep it moist. In time, the material will decompose and as a result, the compost will be produced.

How to grow kale seeds

Place 3 seeds in the corners of a small container with compost, one inch deep. Cover with the compost and water profusely. Water every day. Move to a bigger pot when it grows.

Cómo germinar granos de centeno, lentejas, quinoa

Remojamos una taza de cada grano o frijol en agua filtrada por 8 horas (primero se enjuaga 3 veces con agua filtrada, y después se le agrega agua suficiente como para que se mantengan los granos tapados cuando aumenten su volumen). Después del remojo, se vuelven a enjuagar y se dejan en una bolsita con agujeritos (como media de nylon) o un frasco con una bolsita arriba, a que se escurra el agua, y el aire comience el proceso de germinación. Dejar que crezca una pequeña colita (dos o tres días).

Ensalada de lentejas rojas

Lentejas germinadas de 3 días

Limón o lima

Ajo picado

Cebolla roja

Cilantro picado

Vinagre de manzana

Aceite de olive

Sal

Wheatgrass (hierba de trigo)

Sirve para desintoxicar nuestro cuerpo, como antioxidante, para alcalinizar nuestra sangre, para suprimir el hambre, y como poderoso agente curativo, incluso de enfermedades crónicas, como el cáncer, la diabetes, etc.

Lo hacemos con dos tazas de trigo candeal remojadas en agua filtrada por 8 horas (primero se enjuaga 3 veces con agua filtrada, y después se le agrega agua suficiente como para que se mantengan los granos tapados cuando aumenten su volumen). Después del remojo, se vuelven a enjuagar y se dejan en una bolsita con agujeritos (como media de nylon) o un frasco con una bolsita arriba, a que se escurra el agua, y el aire comience el proceso de germinación. Dejar que crezca una pequeña colita (dos o tres días), y entonces ya están listos los granos para trasladar a tierra orgánica para cultivar. Se colocan los granos en la tierra y se cubren con una toalla de papel, que se remoja un poco y se cubre con una tapa. Los dos primeros días deben permanecer en la oscuridad. Se riega todos los días. Al tercer día, se levanta la tapa, y se deja crecer los granos a la luz (no sol directo). Si hay mucha humedad, no regar. Este es un grano de invierno, al que no le gusta ni el calor ni la humedad. Cuando llega a crecer unos 7cm, cosechar para el jugo, ése es el momento óptimo de la planta.

Abono

Poner todos los restos de vegetales y frutas en un recipiente a oscuras y mezclar con hojas secas. Darlo vueltas varias veces por semana y mojarlo (no mucho). Dejar que se haga el abono con el tiempo.

Cómo cultivar las semillas del repollo (col) rizada (kale)

Poner 3 semillas en los bordes de un recipiente con abono a una pulgada de profundidad, tapar con el abono y regar. Regar todos los días hasta que crezca y trasladar a un recipiente más grande.